Tag Archives: Surveillance

Trust, Community, and Guts: Lessons from 1971 for 2016

On the evening of November 15, the Media Activism Research Collective hosted a screening of 1971. The documentary, created by Johanna Hamilton, recounts the heroic activism of eight ordinary citizens who exposed the extent of the FBI’s illegal surveillance of dissident groups throughout the 1960s and 1970s. A panel discussion including three of the film’s subjects — […]

When old technologies were heavy

The closing scene of Touch of Evil is less famous than its extended, single-shot opening counterpart, but for people interested in ethics of surveillance, it is much more provocative. The movie (infamous both for its squirm-inducingly racist casting and its long editorial battle between the studio and director Orson Welles) closes with good cop Mike […]

Biocode: Exploring the Edge

This week at the University of Pennsylvania, academics, activism, and art will converge at Biocode: Performing Transgression After New Media, a three-day conference envisioned and organized by Penn graduate students across several departments, including gender studies, education, communication, English, history of art, and political science. From April 9 through April 11, Biocode participants will lead audience members through […]

Save the Date: Meet Simone Browne!

Simone Browne, Associate Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, will present her work on surveillance and race at the April 9 – April 11 Biocode conference at Penn. Please join the Media Activism Research Collective and meet Professor Browne for a prelude to Biocode on April 8 at 5 p.m. in Annenberg room 225. Professor Browne […]