MARC Students & Faculty at #ICA16

More than a dozen MARC students and faculty are presenting research at the International Communication Association’s 66th Annual Conference in Fukuoka, Japan. Stop by their panels for exciting discussions about media, activism, and social justice.

FRIDAYJUNE 10

9:30 – 10:45

Fighting the Continuum of Violence From Flaming and Street Harassment to Domestic Violence and Rape (Nire)

  • Rosemary Clark: The Logic of Connective Feminism: Toward an Intersectional Approach to Anti-Street-Harassment Activism

Social Protests and Technology (Kashi)

  • Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon: The Critical Periphery in the Growth of Social Protests

12:30 – 13:45

ICA Plenary Interactive Paper/Poster Session I (Grand Foyer)

  • Kecheng Fang: Weibo, WeChat, and the Chinese Culture of Connectivity

14:00 – 15:15

  • Victor Pickard: Remembering How Our Media Came to Be: A Japanese and American Comparison

15:30 – 16:45

Social Media and Social Movements (Koh)

  • Aaron Shapiro: The Medium is the Mob

Strategies and Tactics in Popular Politics (Yoh)

  • Marwan Kraidy: Animal Symbolism in Political Humor Revolutionary Egypt From “Laughing Cow” to “Roaring Lion”

17:00 – 18:15

Communication Infrastructure and the Social Shaping of Technology (Kusu)

  • Aaron Shapiro: The Urban Stack: A Topology for Urban Data Infrastructures

SATURDAY, JUNE 11

11:00 – 12:15

A BRICS Internet: ‘Balkanizing’ or Broadening the Digital Discourse? (Rigel)

  • Guobin Yang: China’s Internet as a Crossroads

12:30 – 13:45

Social Media and Technology as New Playgrounds: Hashtags and Beyond (Kiku)

  • Rosemary Clark: DIY Feminism: Making the Personal Political – A Work-in-Progress

Masses, Crowds, Media (Koh)

  • Aaron Shapiro: The Mob and the Media

14:00 – 15:15

Data and Surveillance (Koh)

  • Jessa Lingel: Incoded Counterconduct: What the Incarcerated Can Teach Us About Resisting Mass Surveillance

SUNDAY, JUNE 12

8:00 – 9:15

Cold War Histories of Global Media and Politics (Argos C)

  • Elisabetta Ferrari: The History of il Manifesto and the Evolution of the Italian Left from the Prague Spring to the Arab Spring
  • Guobin Yang: The Global Imaginary in China’s Red Guard Press, 1966-1968

New Methods in Communication and Technology (Kusu)

  • Sandra González-Bailón: Scale, Time, and Activity Patterns: Advanced Methods for the Analysis of Online Networks

11:00 – 12:15

Studying News Exposure in the Digital Era (Sumire)

  • Sandra González-Bailón: Online Media Networks and Audience Flow: Fragmentation in the Production and Consumption of News on the Web

The Visual Powers of Place, Space, and Landscape (Fuji)

  • Marwan Kraidy: The City as Medium of Revolution? Beirut Graffiti and the Syrian Uprising
  • Samantha Oliver: The Strange Case of Seattle’s Lenin: The Temporal and Spatial Boundaries of Public Art Engagement
  • Chair: Marwan Kraidy

14:00 – 15:15

Collective Action and Digital Advocacy (Rigel)

  • Elisabetta Ferrari: “Fake” Accounts, Real Activism: Political Faking and User-Generated Satire as Activist Intervention

Work Processes and Production Practices in the Media Industry (Anzu)

  • Pawel Popiel: “Boundaryless” in the Creative Economy: Assessing Freelancing on oDes

The Quantified/Qualified Self (Koh)

  • Jessa Lingel: House, Schoolhouse, Jailhouse: The Other Internet of Things

15:30 – 16:45

Policy Perspectives on Internet Rights for Citizens and Consumers (Fuji)

  • Elisabetta Ferrari: What “The Internet Requires”: The Discourse Of Internet Exceptionalism In The Italian Declaration Of Internet Rights

Histories of Communication Technology: Infrastructures and Flows (Kashi)

  • Jonathan Pace: Decentralization and the Underground Press in 1960s America

Social Media and Social Movements (Koh)

  • Aaron Shapiro: The Medium is the Mob

17:00 – 18:15

Gendering Politics and Political Activisms (Ran)

  • Marwan Kraidy: Body Blows Art, Activism, and Nudity in Times of Revolution

MONDAY, JUNE 13

11:00 – 12:15

Framing and Logics Surveillance and Privacy (Kashi)

  • Tim Libert: The Logic of Connective Surveillance: Distributed Social Movements and the Role of Centralized Communication Infrastructures

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